lightning strikes

nash, 25.

I try to be the best version of me.
the way to create art is to burn and destroyordinary concepts and to substitute themwith new truths that run down from the top of the headand out of the heart.
- Charles Bukowski.
Pondering the Battle of Manila. [[Realizing in hindsight also that this quote does not apply.]] 

the way to create art is to burn and destroy
ordinary concepts and to substitute them
with new truths that run down from the top of the head
and out of the heart.

- Charles Bukowski.

Pondering the Battle of Manila. [[Realizing in hindsight also that this quote does not apply.]] 

malacanan:

Happy birthday, Jose Maceda, whose work with Filipino traditional music “resulted in the collection of an immense number of recorded music taken from the remotest mountain villages and farthest island communities” of the Philippines and ”freed Filipino musical expression from a strictly Eurocentric mold”. (via the National Commission for Culture and the Arts website)
Learn more about the Order of National Artists.

Happy birthday, Mr. Maceda. I almost dropped everything and lived in the mountains because of music. Then I saw your work and realized you had done much more than I could have ever hoped to do.

malacanan:

Happy birthday, Jose Maceda, whose work with Filipino traditional music “resulted in the collection of an immense number of recorded music taken from the remotest mountain villages and farthest island communities” of the Philippines and ”freed Filipino musical expression from a strictly Eurocentric mold”. (via the National Commission for Culture and the Arts website)

Happy birthday, Mr. Maceda. I almost dropped everything and lived in the mountains because of music. Then I saw your work and realized you had done much more than I could have ever hoped to do.

malacanan:


I came to San Francisco starry-eyed, believing that we were going to form an organization that was the culmination of all my dreams.

On June 26, 1945, General Carlos P. Romulo signed the historic United Nations Charter as chairman of the delegation from the Philippine Commonwealth. Standing behind him, from left: newspaper publisher and editor Manuel Manahan, Jose F. Imperial, Erasmo R. Cruz, Solomon V. Arnaldo, and Pedro Lopez. (Photo courtesy of the Carlos P. Romulo Foundation)

Powerful. If only because this is how we all feel entering government. 

malacanan:

I came to San Francisco starry-eyed, believing that we were going to form an organization that was the culmination of all my dreams.

On June 26, 1945, General Carlos P. Romulo signed the historic United Nations Charter as chairman of the delegation from the Philippine Commonwealth. Standing behind him, from left: newspaper publisher and editor Manuel Manahan, Jose F. Imperial, Erasmo R. Cruz, Solomon V. Arnaldo, and Pedro Lopez. (Photo courtesy of the Carlos P. Romulo Foundation)

Powerful. If only because this is how we all feel entering government. 

malacanan:

From Teodoro M. Locsin’s diary entry for December 18, 1941:




In writing during war, a man attaches perhaps undue significance to little acts. He discovers nobility in deeds he would otherwise dismiss, in times of peace, as the work of stale custom or habit. The ordinary run of men acquires a certain splendor in the midst of pain. Suffering may not ennoble, it does magnify.




On this day, Japanese aircraft bombed Iloilo, accurately strafing the military airfield in Mandurriao, a civilian airport near Fort San Pedro, the fuel storage tanks at La Paz, and the harbor facilities along the Iloilo River.



ABOVE: A military map outlining Japan’s offensive campaign in Southeast Asia, December 1941 [via]




Beautiful map is beautiful. 

malacanan:

From Teodoro M. Locsin’s diary entry for December 18, 1941:

In writing during war, a man attaches perhaps undue significance to little acts. He discovers nobility in deeds he would otherwise dismiss, in times of peace, as the work of stale custom or habit. The ordinary run of men acquires a certain splendor in the midst of pain. Suffering may not ennoble, it does magnify.

On this day, Japanese aircraft bombed Iloilo, accurately strafing the military airfield in Mandurriao, a civilian airport near Fort San Pedro, the fuel storage tanks at La Paz, and the harbor facilities along the Iloilo River.

ABOVE: A military map outlining Japan’s offensive campaign in Southeast Asia, December 1941 [via]

Beautiful map is beautiful. 

In (the 1930s) people remembered World War I and how countries had blundered into it because their leaders didn’t want to stand down. It was a pointless argument and millions of people had been killed. We sent hundreds of thousands of Americans out there and got back a whole load of coffins. It was called the ‘war to end all wars,’ but in the 1920s we had books and stage plays like ‘The Big Parade’, which became a great movie, showing what a waste it all was. Then again, in the Depression people were getting fed up with politicians and governments. There was a crazy slogan, before Roosevelt: ‘Prosperity is just around the corner.’ But you turned the corner and it was just the same cheesy mess as before.

Groucho Marx, from Coffee With Groucho, by Simon Louvish, (c)2007 (via placeswithinme)

Reasons to read the grouchy Marx.

(via placeswithinme-deactivated20121)

malacanan:

TODAY IN HISTORY: On October 25, 1762, residents of Manila were compelled to swear allegiance to King George III of the United Kingdom of Great Britain and Northern Ireland.

TOP: Portrait of George III by Allan Ramsay, circa 1762. [via] BOTTOM: The 1762 British Conquest of Manila, in context. Learn more about Britain’s two-year stint in the Philippines at the Presidential Museum and Library website.

King George III was a mad king. He reminds me of peacocks. I didn’t know why at first—prolly a reference I picked up from somewhere—so, I Googled it and voila!

British King George III had a mental illness. For a time, he ended every sentence with the word “peacock.” He also sometimes spoke for many hours without pause, and claimed to talk to angels. [via]

Now I want to try lecturing and saying peacock! Or maybe some other random animal. 

malacanan:

From the Malacañan Palace Facebook page: One of the many distinguished guests of Malacañan Palace was Armi Helena Kuusela, the first woman crowned Miss Universe, who paid a courtesy call on President Elpidio Quirino in 1953. She was invited to be a judge in the Miss Philippines pageant. [Above, from left to right: President Quirino receiving Miss Kuusela and Miss Philippines Teresita Villareal.]

SM: I first encountered the astoundingly blonde Miss Kuusela while researching for a short story I was writing, one set in post-WW2 Manila. Here in the Philippines, shaking our President’s hand: the first Miss Universe—there’s something awe-inspiring about that, how this teenager from Finland would help shape one of the foremost institutions of beauty. Miss Kuusela charmed hearts left and right, I am sure—including, according to one story, then-Congressman Ferdinand E. Marcos. Miss Kuusela, however, would meet the man who was to be her husband, Virgilio Hilario, in Baguio—during a blind date. They would have five children. [That short story, it turned out, couldn’t let go of Miss Kuusela; she had to traipse all over it, all beaming and dazzling and Finnish.]


I read this story then closed my eyes to imagine how it must have played out. Happy to know that the writer was true to her word—Miss Kuusela is absolutely stunning and brimming with grace. 
—-Also, filing this under perks of current occupation. We’re allowed to digress, to feed the monster that is curiosity.

malacanan:

From the Malacañan Palace Facebook page: One of the many distinguished guests of Malacañan Palace was Armi Helena Kuusela, the first woman crowned Miss Universe, who paid a courtesy call on President Elpidio Quirino in 1953. She was invited to be a judge in the Miss Philippines pageant. [Above, from left to right: President Quirino receiving Miss Kuusela and Miss Philippines Teresita Villareal.]

SM: I first encountered the astoundingly blonde Miss Kuusela while researching for a short story I was writing, one set in post-WW2 Manila. Here in the Philippines, shaking our President’s hand: the first Miss Universe—there’s something awe-inspiring about that, how this teenager from Finland would help shape one of the foremost institutions of beauty. Miss Kuusela charmed hearts left and right, I am sure—including, according to one story, then-Congressman Ferdinand E. Marcos. Miss Kuusela, however, would meet the man who was to be her husband, Virgilio Hilario, in Baguio—during a blind date. They would have five children. [That short story, it turned out, couldn’t let go of Miss Kuusela; she had to traipse all over it, all beaming and dazzling and Finnish.]

I read this story then closed my eyes to imagine how it must have played out. Happy to know that the writer was true to her word—Miss Kuusela is absolutely stunning and brimming with grace. 

—-Also, filing this under perks of current occupation. We’re allowed to digress, to feed the monster that is curiosity.

To denounce does not free the self from what it hates, any more than ignoring the past shuts off its influence.

Jacques Barzun (via iwriteasiwrite)

Happy to see more of Barzun’s quotes on Tumblr. Sometimes I wonder how people like him must have lived? Did they live dual lives—being at once, academic and commoner but with separate audiences? 

Today’s biting question.